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Re: Is it spam if it's targeted?

From: Carmen Paulino <clpsf_at_sirius.com>
Date: Wed 25 Oct 2000 07:36:27 -0500

MARK PEPER <mark_at_hirerocket.com> WROTE:
> We did an email campaign to a very targeted group.
> Our response was great. 13% of the group came back to
> our site and over 5% did exactly what we wanted them to
> do. . . My question is: Would this be considered
> spamming?

If you have a festering, ingrown toenail and you have
two solutions that will clearly fix the problem, (1)
lengthy medicinal treatment or (2) cut your foot off,
and you select the latter for its quick efficacy and
short-term resolution, what have you gained? More
importantly, look at what have you lost. If you want
marketing success and you have two solutions, (1) a
lengthier no-spam marketing plan, or (2) short-term,
spam success, and you select the latter, what have you
gained?

> On a sales/marketing side I have a hard time
> believing this is bad.

The point is not what you perceive, but what your
market wants. Successful business is not about
satisfying you, but about satisfying your customers'
expectations and needs. It's clear: people are
offended and angered by spam - there is no gray area on
this issue. Your company can be booted from ISP's, you
will be reported to places like SpamCop and worst, you
can be placed on a blacklist. It doesn't matter if your
list is targeted. If it smells like spam, and looks
like spam, it is generally perceived to be spam.

Until the environment changes where Internet audiences
accept unsolicited email marketing just like they do
offline, you are doing yourself and your company a
long-term disservice.

> About 1/100 of 1% (.001%) requested to be taken off
> the list. Our ISP provider sent us a message that
> spamming is not part of there policy and if we do it
> again we run the risk of being shut down.

Most people do not respond to spam for fear of
providing the spammer with verification that their
email address is valid. Instead, the great majority
report you to your ISP and to spam-watching sites. This
is most likely why you only saw 1/100th of 1% asking to
be taken off your list. For all you know, the 87% that
didn't show up on your site could have instead reported
your company as a spammer.

> We did do a lot of research and worked with a very
targeted group, but the numbers prove it worked.

Don't you think *everybody* would do this if it made
long-term business and marketing sense?

Carmen Paulino
Xaphon
Interactive Advertising
www.xaphon.com





Received on Wed Oct 25 2000 - 07:36:27 CDT


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